Blockchain Companies Dominate the Forbes Fintech 50 List 2018 0 31

The headlines have been dominated by the crypto world of late. Mostly, the record highs and plummeting lows of Bitcoin’s value and hackers syphoning off money from major ICOs. All this negative press is enough to make investors nervous, but it isn’t all bad news. In fact, as Forbes releases its Fintech 50 list for 2018, nine of the companies are blockchain.

The Impact of Blockchain on the Financial Industry

Beyond the concerns about digital currency, whether Bitcoin’s real value has been inflated, and major banks banning purchase of it with their credit cards; blockchain has further implications for the financial industry. In fact, blockchain technology could be the answer to many an outdated and inefficient solution in the banking world, revolutionizing how financial transactions are recorded and carried out worldwide.

The fact that blockchain technology can trace specific transactions and provide transparency make them music to the ears of agencies like the IRS and FBI. Blockchain doesn’t just drive efficiency, it changes the whole manner in which trust is federated between buyer and seller, government agencies and countries.

By using smart contracts, blockchain digitalizes and automates the information, removing various counterparties that were previously involved in that process, effectively cutting out the middleman and creating greater transparency. Let’s take a look at some of the companies causing a stir in the blockchain community:

The Bitfury Group, Amsterdam

The Bitfury Group make hardware and software that allows for Bitcoin mining and security. They also provide software that supports blockchain in supply chains for government and insurance, specifically working with the government of Georgia to transfer land titles to the blockchain.

According to Valery Vavilov, CEO & Co-Founder and one of the richest men in cryptocurrency, “The internet allows us to digitize information and transfer it globally, but it lacked a solution to digitize and securely transfer assets. The Bitfury Group utilizes the technology of the Blockchain to allow companies to successfully digitize their assets and safely transact them over the internet – making the world safer, simpler and more efficient.”

Chainalysis, New York

It’s bad news for would-be crypto criminals with companies like Chainalysis gaining protagonism. With customers including the IRS, FBI and Drug Enforcement Administration, this newcomer to the Forbes Fintech 50 is allowing major institutions and law enforcement agencies to trace specific transactions. This could mean an end to money laundering and illicit transactions.

Claiming to “protect the junction between finance and the decentralized internet,” Chainalysis is the leading provider of anti-money laundering software for Bitcoin, with customers racking up over $15 billion worth of transactions on their platform.

Coinbase, San Francisco

Widely recognized as the easiest and most user-friendly platform to start your journey into the cryptocurrency world, most people have been introduced to Coinbase by now. Trading in Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin, this trusted tool offers customers digital currency wallets, and has already racked up over 10 million users, registering more than $1 billion in revenue and over $50 billion in transactions. Its Co-Founder, Brian Armstrong, also made the Forbes list of the Richest People In Cryptocurrency.

Shapeshift, Zug, Switzerland

They say it’s all about location, location, location, and Shapshift’s headquarters in a country famous for its financial institutions is no accident. Claiming to be the “safest, fastest asset exchange on earth,” users can trade in up to 70 different cryptocurrencies, without even setting up an account or having a wallet. How very Swiss of them.

With a focus on privacy, Shapeshift does not accept fiat currencies and does not link to any bank accounts. The benefits of this were accidentally showcased not so long ago when the company was hacked into by a disgruntled employee. No crypto was lost at all, due to the fact that the company does not hold onto customer funds.

As the fintech industry begins to reach something close to maturity, it’s clear that blockchain is leading the charge in 2018. With an emphasis on transparency, security, and privacy for those who want to keep their financial transactions under wraps, there’s a blockchain company out there to tackle most financial woes.

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Christina is a technology and business communicator who has worked with high profile ICOs and blockchain influencers to break industry news.

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These Entrepreneurs Are Building the Blank Canvas of the New Internet 0 315

We need a new internet. This HTTP stuff is left over from the ‘90s. It’s corporate controlled in the post neutrality world, susceptible to government censorship, inaccessible to many with nearly half the world’s population still unable to connect. It increasingly needs a more streamlined makeover.

Or at least a little house cleaning. How many apps can we possibly have? How many passwords and accounts? How much content can we cram in here? What do we do with the ever growing graveyard of dead links, old MySpace accounts and cat memes, to say nothing of the emptying, generic cruise ship we call Facebook drifting steadily away from relevance? One possible answer: clean the slate. Start again. This time with something more efficient.

Imagining the Internet 2.0

By some indicators, blockchain could be the thing to supplant the internet as the de facto way we create, communicate and store data. But how will we see it widely implemented without it first becoming more user friendly to the layperson? SMBs and entrepreneurs don’t necessarily have a background in programming, nor have the skills to set their business up on the blockchain. Learning to program or hiring a team of blockchain devs isn’t always within reach to the average SMB, to say nothing of individual artisans or small nonprofits.

By contrast, consider how easy it is to start up a website. You can do it in a few hours, thanks to software platforms that make it easy. You get your URL from GoDaddy, a visual template from WordPress or SquareSpace, who also might bundle in your ecommerce space if you haven’t set that up with Shopify already. It’s because of these SaaS and PaaS third parties that we can web.

If we want to go blockchain, we’ll need a third parties like these to help facilitate it. So where are these platforms? Who’s building them?

The Deregulated Ecommerce Toolkit

Well, Eric Tippetts, for one. Tippetts expects the 2020s to see a shift to blockchain much like the 90s shift to the information superhighway and the 2010s shift to mobile. To speed things along, his company NASGO has created a toolkit called BlockBox, the goal of which is to be the ‘GoDaddy of blockchain’ so people and businesses can start building.

Through BlockBox, which Tippetts cocreated with a development team, you can find and secure a blockchain domain address, like you would with a URL, adapt your existing website for blockchain, and create a custom token. Instead of having to wrap your head around lines of code or hire a dev team, it just takes a couple minutes and a couple hundred bucks.

Tippetts describes NASGO itself as “a decentralized hosting environment that allows content to be seen in every part of the world, opening up blocked boundaries for communication and collaboration.” It also includes a platform for decentralized apps (DAPPS) that could compete with Apple and Google’s app stores.

Their website repeatedly emphasizes the deregulated nature of the product, ostensibly gearing their platform toward the “businesses, developers and consumers” of a sharing and open ecommerce.

A Platform for Public and Private Good

Amber Baldet’s company Clovyr has similar goals, but with a distinctly different tone. She wants people to use their DAPP platform to “build the systems we want to see in the world.”

Baldet left JP Morgan Chase, where she was hired to spearhead their out-of-character blockchain experiments, to found her startup. She recently testified before congress about blockchain regulation and the importance of protecting human rights and privacy early on, while the technology is still in its infancy.

She says that there needn’t be a divide between public and private interests when it comes to blockchain. “It’s very divided, the people that are building things for public chain and people that are building things for ‘permissioned’ or business enterprise kind of chains,” said Baldet in an interview with Fortune. She says that nomenclature isn’t helpful, “because it creates this kind of animosity where we’re saying that big business is on one side and the people or the proletariat are on the other side, when really it should just be about information residing where it makes sense and creating security boundaries that are logical.”

Building a Blank Canvas

In a way, the blockchain is a platform much like the internet itself, a canvas available for anybody to use, whatever their interests and intentions are.

So whatever direction the blockchain internet-nouveau of the future takes, if that’s really what we’re in for, people like Tippetts and Baldet are the architects of its structure. It’ll be up to the rest of to fill it up with content. Hopefully good content. Bring the memes, leave the corporate derelicts.

The Block Talk Awards 0 101

The first inaugural Block Talk Award nominations are open now. The 2018 Awards will recognize the influencers that are pushing the industry forward through innovation and analysis. Nominations will be accepted from August 13, 2018 to September 1, 2018 at 10pm PT. To qualify, influencers should have at least a cumulative following of 10,000 across social media platforms, or similar readership across relevant blogs and web properties.

Winners in each category will receive a $1500 media credit on The Block Talk, access to a network of TBT Award honorees, and VIP access to TBT events in 2019.

Nominate yourself or your favorite influencers in the following categories:

  • Best ICO Analysis & Commentary
  • Most Engaged Community
  • Favorite Blockchain Blogger
  • Best Crypto Journalist
  • Innovative Female Founder
  • Best Podcast Host(s)
  • Favorite Blockchain Event Host
  • Top Crypto Speaker
  • Most Innovative Blockchain CEO
  • Top Social Entrepreneur

Submit Your Nomination

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